Luang Prabang ~ Kuang Si Waterfalls

CharterĀ a tuk-tuk or mini van to take you the 40 minutes to this paradisaical locale. First, we hike up the hill, and meet the bears, rather playful and seemingly happy. They are the Asian Bears, sometimes called Sun Bear or Moon Bear, depending on the color stripe on their chest. These guys were climbing and scratching and fun to watch, but that cold water was calling to my sweaty backpacked back.

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It’s not long before being greeted with the dream like waterfalls and miraculously colored blue water. I had seen no pictures of this before, so it was all a wonderful surprise.

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I dove right in…

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Quiet, cold water mixed with that soothing sound of flowing water created an atmosphere of cheek hurting smiles.

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After soaking for a while, I took a walk higher into the trees. I met a guy on the trail and we hiked talking about mutual interests such as The Mighty Ducks’ movies. The jungle trees were dense and old.

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Because of poor planning, I was only able to spend a much too brief half day here. I could have stayed longer. Such a pleasure even if it went too fast. It was like that 5$ truffle you buy at the mall, you only get one delicious bite, but it’s usually one to remember.

4,000 Islands ~ Water Fights, Water Falls and Whatta Beach

The shared New Year’s Celebration of Thailand, Cambodia and Laos in mid-April is water fueled mayhem and renewed spirituality. It signifies the washing away of the past, and being clean for the next year. It’s a time to clean your Buddha and ignore the trash outside. A time to burn incense and drink BeerLao. A time to sing and dance…at 6:00am. My guesthouse Mama, took us to the first day of the water festival to partake of Buddha washing. I found some of their faces (esp. kids) stern and kind in a simulacrum of a young, suspicious Buddha.

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The Mekong, “mother of rivers,” emerald in dry, murkish brown in wet season, slow and surely winding from the high steppes of Tibet down through the green mountains of Indochina before spreading in the fertileĀ alluvial plains of Vietnam felt mystical. It holds a place of honor among rivers as being the scene of a famous movie, Apocalypse Now, much better than the Amazon’s with Anaconda. At the border of Laos and Vietnam, the Mekong, stretches into a 14 km wide mass. Along the fault lines of this throbbing aquatic expansion lie some amazing waterfalls. I visited one on the nearby island of Don Khon, where we could safely swim in the circular current of a random bay.

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At the tip of Don Det, the loading area for passengers and motorbikes being transported to other islands, sits the small sandy area, well-polluted with bottlecaps, cig butts, and plastic bottles, generously called a beach. On this particular Tuesday, there was a funny, curious puppy who liked to steal one poor Canadian girl’s sandals and run. We all watched our free canine entertainment, soaked in sun, treaded water against the current and enjoyed the sunset among new acquaintances.

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